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Posts tagged ‘poverty’

I, Daniel Blake demands a political response

Mark Stephens argues that the underlying solution to the misery inflicted on the characters portrayed in David Loach’s film lies in reforming policy, not charity.

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Having Talked the Talk, Which Way should we Walk?

Drawing on new research for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Professor Glen Bramley considers what policies would substantially reduce poverty in the UK.

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The ‘more or less?’ quiz on ‘counting the cost of uk poverty’

Glen Bramley discusses the findings of his new Joseph Rowntree Foundation research counting the costs of poverty in the UK.

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Destitution and foodbanks in the UK: new evidence sheds light on topical debates

Dr Filip Sosenko examines food bank use in the UK drawing on new data from the JRF-funded Destitution study.

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Hard Edges cut through eternal standoff on social policy

New research mapping severe and multiple disadvantage in England shines a new and striking light on centuries old debate about whether poor people owe their circumstances to structural economic factors or to moral/behavioural failings.

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Soaring rent rises to leave nearly 6 million private renters living in poverty by 2040

The rising cost of private rents will put the next generation at a much greater risk of poverty, and may result in major increases to Housing Benefit costs.

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Miserable in our own way? Poverty, Exclusion, Inequality and the Scottish Independence Debate

Professor Glen Bramley discusses why he believes that from a poverty and welfare perspective, Scotland should stay within the UK.

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Tackling Poverty in the UK: the best evidence and the right perspective

Earlier this year, I took part in an event focusing on how lasting change for people and places in poverty can be achieved. Here is my answer - By Beth Watts.

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“Gulf in council spending may divide society”

“Cuts may force councils to stop funding arts and leisure services by 2015” and “Britain’s poorest and most deprived areas hit hardest as society becomes unacceptably more divided”. Read more

Research conversation: What do we mean by UK poverty?

What do we mean by poverty? How can poverty exist in a developed society such as the United Kingdom? Is UK poverty as “real” as poverty in Africa? Kirsten Besemer and Peter Matthews discuss these questions and why they should concern planners, as part of a series of Research Conversations. Read more

Seminar: Housing and Impoverishment

Our next IHURER seminar will be on Wednesday 23/10/2013 by Professor Glen Bramley. All seminars start at 4.15pm and take place in WA 3.11. For a full list of seminars, click here Read more

Michael Gove and the real picture of poverty in Britain

Gill Main, Research Fellow at the Social Policy Research Unit, University of York and member of the Poverty and Social Exclusion UK team, discusses the difference between the rhetoric and reality of poverty.

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IHURER News – September 2013

First edition of the IHURER Newsletter, where we will share with you news from the Institute, recent publications and conference appearances and dates for your diary.

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Anti-poverty strategies and equality policies – distant cousins?

Gina's research has revealed significantly higher poverty rates for Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and Blacks (including Black Africans, Black Caribbeans and Black Other) than other ethnic groups in both Scotland and England (Netto et al, 2011). In this post, she makes recommendations for anti-poverty strategies in the light of these findings.

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Charity Shops: Does every little really help?

Continuing on from her first piece ‘Charity Shops: Curse or Crux of the High Street?’, Dr. Nicola Livingstone reflects on the retail character of these shops in the twenty-first century. Are charity shops and their drive towards profit maximisation proving effective in achieving increased income for their relative causes, or are they caught-up in the quagmire of competition, constantly changing to remain relevant?

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Has the ‘Big Society’ reached the frontline of statutory homelessness services?

David Cameron’s flagship ‘Big Society’ project has been subject to much debate since its inception a few years ago, both around what it actually is, and the nature of its true agenda. A few commentators believe the Big Society represents a qualitative shift in political ideology; others take the view that it is primarily a tool to justify austerity measures. Read more

Report: Better measures of local incomes and poverty in Scotland

The Income Modelling Project was carried out by Heriot Watt University with the aim of developing improved measures of local incomes and poverty in Scotland at small area level. Professor Glen Bramley and David Watkins have now published a report on their findings. Read more

Scottish impoverishment reported in media

Although Scotland does slightly better than the UK average, poverty in Scotland is the worst it has been in 30 years.

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Press Release: New figures on the impoverishment of the UK

Key findings of the Poverty and Social Exclusion (PSE) Project, published today in its first report ‘The Impoverishment of the UK’.

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The impoverishment of the UK

This morning the Guardian published the first headline results from the Poverty and Social Exclusion project. Our data shows that 33% of British households lacked at least three basic living necessities in 2012, compared with 14% in 1983.

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Poverty research broadcast on ITV

The first results from this study were broadcast on ITV at 7.30pm on Thursday, March 28th in a special ‘Tonight’ programme on ‘Breadline Britain’.

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Opinion and prejudice in child poverty research

Nine in ten people wrongly believe that drug and alcohol addiction are a main cause of child poverty in the UK, according to a recent DWP survey. Dr Kirsten Besemer, researcher at IHURER and member of the Poverty and Social Exclusion UK team, explains how child poverty measures can incorporate public opinion while avoiding unfounded prejudice.

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